Why The Number Two Exec at Major Firms May be More Important Than That of The CEO

sundar pichai
Sundar Pichai, Google CEO

by Kyla Camille Nievera, World Executives DigestMost people can identify the CEO of a major company.  Ask someone if they know who Mark Zuckerberg is or Elon Musk or Warren Buffett.  Chances are that most people can identify these business leaders.  But what about names like Anthony Noto, Sheryl Sandberg and JB Straubel?  Chances are you might get blank stares if you mention these names and expect people to know who they are.  Just because people don’t recognize these high powered business executives, doesn’t mean they don’t have a major impact in the business world.

Topgrading, a group of hiring and interviewing methodology experts recently compiled a list of second in command executives at some of American’s most iconic companies. For each executive they looked at:

  • The time spent with the company
  • Time in current role
  • Compensation for 2016
  • Education
  • Career history
  • Current responsibilities at their company

Topgrading wanted to see the value that each of these second in command executives had within their respective organizations. They took this list and created a comprehensive infographic that can be seen below. Among the list you will see executives from major companies like Twitter, Facebook, Tesla, Salesforce, Zappos, Google, Amazon, AT&T, Whole Foods, Apple, and Starbucks among many other corporate giants.

The list of executives is impressive with people from varying backgrounds and experiences. They did profile a snapshot of the average number two executive.  Here’s what they found:

  • They’ve been with the company for 21 years
  • Been in the current role for roughly 5 years
  • Earned roughly $17.5 million last year
  • Has a Harvard degree

To see the full list from Topgrading, check out the infographic below.  You will learn more about the second in command at major companies than you ever wished to know.

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